Sierra Leone

ELEMENTS OF CONTEXT

HISTORY

DEMOGRAPHY

SOCIO-ECONOMICAL CONTEXT

Sierra Leone is a country rich in valuable natural resources, including diamonds. However, a decade of brutal civil war has ravaged the country, leaving 50,000 people dead, countless amputees and many more people displaced. The country has plummeted to one of the poorest in the world and is hugely reliant on international aid.

Since peace was declared in 2002, Sierra Leone has faced the huge challenge of reconstruction. Parts of the country remain without electricity or running water and huge piles of rubbish can be seen on the streets. To add to the country’s problems, in July 2005 a massive flood caused many more citizens to lose their homes.

Normal life is gradually being restored, but for most, survival is still a struggle. Unemployment is high and living conditions are poor, with tin shacks being commonplace and five or six people often living in one room.

Source : Habitat for Humanity

HABITAT

HISTORY OF CITIES – HERITAGE

URBAN HOUSING

RURAL HOUSING

RIGHT TO HOUSING

FORCED EVICTION

LAND RIGHTS

LAND GRABBING

VULNERABLE GROUPS

  • Joungpeople
  • Old people
  • Women

SOME INTERESTING PRACTICES

Social and economic aspects

HOUSING MARKET

QUALITY OF HOUSING

INFORMAL HOUSING / SLUM / HOMELESS

ROLE OF PUBLIC AUTHORITIES

Cultural aspects – Religious – Symbolic

Environmental aspects

Bibliography & Sitography

MAJOR PROBLEMS BY CIVIL SOCIETY

CLAIMS MAJOR CIVIL SOCIETY

CIVIL SOCIETY ACTORS

  • FEDERATION OF URBAN AND RURAL POOR – FEDURP = founded in 2011, the federation promote savings schemes with a lot of households. Over time the federation has built strong relationships with local government offices, along with the private and public sector. These relationships have resulted in both the Mayor and the Chief Administrator (CA) registering their support of the federation’s work. Website
  • HABITAT FOR HUMANITY SIERRA LEONE = had a working partnership with World Relief since 2005, but the partnership came to an end in 2006. During this period, Habitat for Humanity and World Relief managed to house 600 returning refugees in the district of Kailahun. This project also included those families who were in temporary housing in one of the communities worst hit by the floods which struck in 2005. Participation by families in rebuilding their own, permanent homes provided them with not only a physical but psychological anchor to face the daunting challenge of re-establishing livelihoods lost after so many years in exile and conflict. Website

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