Equatorial Guinea

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ELEMENTS OF CONTEXT

HISTORY

DEMOGRAPHY

Survey on Demography and Health equatorial Guinea in 2011, shows that the average per dwelling is 4.6. 56% of households have access to safe drinking water (82% in urban areas) and 66% have electric lighting (93% in urban areas). Africatime website

SOCIO-ECONOMICAL CONTEXT

The Republic of Equatorial Guinea has the distinction of having a high GDP per capita and human development index very low. Despite rapid growth through the production of hydrocarbons, increasing poverty and living conditions of the majority of the population, as measured by traditional indicators (infant mortality, life expectancy, …) deteriorate. The country is typically an “enclave economy”, the growth of an isolated area with no ripple effect on other sectors. It is growth without development. In the absence of proactive policies to address these imbalances, the majority of the people of Equatorial Guinea does not benefit from the profits generated by the oil industry.

Between 1994 and 2004, the population is classified as living in extreme poverty, or on less than a dollar a day. (1)

THE EDUCATIONAL SECTOR

Poor nutrition, inadequate access to health care and drinking water … a very low weight at birth … are explanations of the low academic achievement of children. Only 10% of students reach their 5th year without repeating! (1)

HABITAT

HISTORY OF CITIES – HERITAGE

URBAN HOUSING

RURAL HOUSING

RIGHT TO HOUSING

Since 1995, Article 13 of the Constitution provides that every citizen shall enjoy the following rights and freedoms: free movement and residence. Source: CETIM (publication COHRE)

FORCED EVICTION

LAND RIGHTS

The country is no different from other forest countries of equatorial Africa. The blood, nor the boubi seem to have a strong tradition of property rights in the form of individual private property. If the custom property of a Community collective village land does exist, it suffers from important limitations. Land or village forest is not really alienable by exchange dealer or strictly recognized and protected by modern law, because the state has no duty to compensate communities “owners” of origin. (1)

LAND GRABBING

VULNERABLE GROUPS

SOME INTERESTING PRACTICES

Social and economic aspects

HOUSING MARKET

QUALITY OF HOUSING

INFORMAL HOUSING / SLUM / HOMELESS

ROLE OF PUBLIC AUTHORITIES

Cultural aspects – Religious – Symbolic

Environmental aspects

Bibliography & Sitography

  1. Equatorial Guinea: growth without development?, Kiari Liman Tinguiri, UNDP member, STATECO N°105, 2010. Download the document

MAJOR PROBLEMS BY CIVIL SOCIETY

CLAIMS MAJOR CIVIL SOCIETY

CIVIL SOCIETY ACTORS

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